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intensity

The intensity of the sound produced by a vibratory body, depends upon the amplitude of its vibrations.

The intensity of a sound varies inversely as the square of the distance from its origin, only when the sound waves can radiate freely in all directions without interruption. (Harris, T. F.; Hand Book of Acoustics, 5th edition; J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1903?)

"It has been found by experiment that not only does the intensity of sound vary with the amplitude of the vibrations of the sounding body; but as nearly as the square of the amplitude. For instance, if a piano string can be made to vibrate so that the width of swing in its motion is one-fiftieth of an inch, and if another piano string giving the same pitch can be made to vibrate with an amplitude of one twenty-fifth of an inch, then the second will have an amplitude twice that of the first and its intensity will be approximately four times as great." (Piano Tuning and Allied Arts)

"intensity varies as the square of the amplitude" (Harris, T. F.; Hand Book of Acoustics, 5th edition; J. Curwen & Sons, London, 1903?, page 138)

"The intensity of a feeling or thought or mental image is, therefore, the important element in determining its subsequent physical materialization." (Seth/Jane Roberts, Session 525, p.66, Seth Speaks)

See Also

12.04 - Locked Potentials and the Square Law
Amperage as opposed to Voltage
Amplitude
Inverse Square Law
Locked Potentials and the Square Law
Power
Sound Power
Sound Pressure
Square Law


Page last modified on Monday 29 of April, 2013 06:47:09 MDT

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