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The Keely Motor Company

THE KEELY MOTOR COMPANY.

STOCKHOLDERS HARDLY KNOW WHAT TO DO NOW THAT KEELY IS DEAD

MYSTERIOUS COMMUNICATION.


PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 20, 1898. - The first meeting of the stockholders of the Keely Motor Company since the death of John W. Keely, the inventor, was held in this city to-day. Charles S. Hill? attorney for the inventor's widow, stated that Keely's secret did not exist in manuscript, but that Keely had made a suggestion before his death that Kinraide of Boston was the one man who could successfully carry out his idea. A long and spirited discussion ensued as to what course should be pursued. It was finally agreed to leave the entire matter in the hands of the Board of Directors.

After Mr. Hill had made his statement he announced that he had a secret which he would impart to one man. This communication, he said, was of a nature to encourage the stockholders and to induce them to leave everything in Kinraide's hands for one year. John J. Smith?, one of the Directors of the company, was appointed to confer with the lawyer. Meantime the stockholders elected the following Directors: B. L. Ackerman, George H. Hastings?, John J. Smith?, A. M. Clomney? of New York, and Lancaster Thomas?, Sylvester Snyder?, and John Marston? of this city.

To-night Mr. Smith reported that he was not yet thoroughly satisfied as to what would be most desirable, but that the secret imparted to him by Mr. Hill offered great encouragement to the stockholders. Mr. Smith could not be induced to divulge any of the information given him.

KMC - Stock Certificate

KMC - Stock Certificate



See Also

Affairs of the Keely Motor Company
A Trustful Stockholder
Cause of Low Stock Prices (external link)
Chronology
Keely - Historical Documents
Keely Motor Company
Who made the Company? (external link)


Page last modified on Friday 21 of February, 2014 06:09:12 MST

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